Windows Phone 7: Don’t Bother with this Disaster. Hmm….

Just to add, I would’ve liked to comment on the actual blog post, but my registration has been pending ‘moderation’ for a while…..

Update(19/07) – If you’re looking for a good laugh, head over to InfoWorld’s article, but if you want reviews by people who have had technical preview versions of the device sent to them, you can see a list of them here. Also, I’m still waiting for my registration to be moderated…..

I’ve read many articles regarding Windows Phone 7, some positive, some negative and some on the fence. Of course, no one knows for sure what the outcome will be, so these articles are welcome and an interesting debate can be brought to the table. This, being a WP7 blog, obviously believes that MS have a real chance with WP7 and are on track to really reinvent themselves in the mobile market. Having said that, I base my judgements of reasoning and facts and am willing to admit that it may not all come up roses. But, like most forecasting, I’m hedging my bets and am developing for the WP7 platform.

When I come across negative articles, even misinformed ones, I just brush them off and move on. But, I happened to catch an article on Infoworld which makes no attempt to hide its bias against MS. The first article (which is also referenced to in the main article) claims that developer’s are ‘tepid’ about the whole beta kit. Their source? A few developers. That’s right, these few developers (one of whom wanted to remain anonymous) has suddenly become the voice of developers worldwide. I obviously missed that meeting. That sets the tone of their articles and journalism style. Now, I’m not naïve to believe I’ll convert the author Galen Gruman to WP7, but there are many readers who come across these articles and take the information on face-value. Just like in my “Bringing Light to a Darkened WP7” article, this post is designed to help bring balance to the picture to show the neutral reader that there two sides to the coin (and not the one side shown in Infoworld’s 2D article).

The title of Galen’s article is “Windows Phone 7: Don’t Bother with this Disaster“. Eye-catching, intriguing and the headline fulfils its job of luring the reader in. Good job. Now lets analyse!

And the distinct UI — though based on the unsuccessful Zune media player…

Yes, the Zune wasn’t very successful on the surface. Now, he may be right, it just didn’t take off. Or, it could’ve been a business decision seeing as the MP3 market was not growing as fast as the smartphone market. Coming into the MP3 market worldwide, at such a late stage and on the trail of the iPod, may not have made much business sense. Instead, it would  be better to focus on the Zune service, see what the reception to that is, integrate music functionality into the smartphone and expand the Zune service globally – which is what’s happening. The Zune service is said to be better than the iTunes one (from pricing, interface and their respective music recommendation services). However, I’m not going to post links that back this point up, so reader’s can do their own research, see the broader picture and then decide on what they feel the general consensus is. If the latter wasn’t the plan, and it was a failure by market demand, then it’s a failure of a service I look forward to welcoming on a global scale.

Anywho, lets get to the facts the author has up his sleeves to have him ultimately jump to the conclusion that WP7 is a disaster.

Now that I’ve seen [the Metro UI] more in action, all I can say is how clunky it is. You will scroll and scroll to find what you want, thanks to how Microsoft has oversimplified all tasks. Each tile has just a little bit of information — often just three items — and you’re supposed to scroll sideways via finger gestures to see details on each option in full, then click the one you want to get more details. But if you have more than a few apps in a tile, for example, this approach quickly gets too ungainly, hiding most options and requiring navigation down (and up) several layers of interface. It will be the gesture version of spinning your wheels.

I believe Galen has missed the point of having information on tiles. They’re there as a brief overview of any new news. I wouldn’t expect my whole email text to be present in the mail tile, a number showing how many unread emails I have would suffice. Now, explaining the process in a verbose manner -which is what is done here – makes the UI seem long-winded. However, watching it in action is the best way to see it. In order not to show only the best video to prove my point, again I’ll let the reader decide what they think of the UI. Naturally, UI is something that is personal to a user and so I can’t sit here and tell you the UI is great. I can only say I think it’s great and I don’t personally have the same problem with it as Galen seems to.

He also adds

The developers at Mobile Beat quickly recognized the labor-intensity of this UI method and one asked the Microsoft rep if anyone had bothered to test it with users. The answer was essentially “no” — a scary thought indeed.

I personally don’t believe an MS rep would claim that they hadn’t test the UI with users.

Also, the big tiles quickly eat up screen real estate (about four fit)

Err…

tiles

…I guess that’s why not all the tiles are made large?

It’s a subtle difference: Using a panorama basically means the tile continues because it won’t fit on screen, while using a pivot means you have a series of what are essentially pages. I bet developers and users will get confused very fast

I’ll be honest, this may have come up many times, but this is the first time I’ve heard anyone get confused about this.

The maps app also had a strong clunkiness to it, both visually (the overly thick borders on things) and operationally (panning and zooming caused a lot of awkward screen redraws).

Once again, I don’t see the awkward redraws. (Check 2:10). Maybe the ‘redraw’ was caused by blinking…?

Ok, now Galen gets into undeniable facts – these are fair points and if the entire article was like this, then it would be worth a read.

1) It uses IE 7 with bits of IE8 – I agree, this is something I can’t defend. I don’t know the reasons behind this decison and I hope that they embrace HTML 5.

2) It’s this whole issue of multitasking again. There’s a reason people have complained about the battery life of iPhones and Android devices. Most consumers are not technically minded. If they see the ability to run multiple apps, they will. However, this will drain the battery and the phone will be blamed, not the fact that multiple applications were run continuously. Now, add to that, the fact that anyone can develop for these phones. This means inexperienced developers greedily hogging resources (purposely or because they don’t know better) creating buggy and battery draining applications. I would love to have multitasking and I have so many app ideas that would benefit. But if you’re going to introduce it, do it right – not just because it sounds cool.

3) It’s a continuation of multitasking and the fact that 3rd party apps cannot launch other 3rd party apps. Again, I would love to have this feature, but there are security issues at play. Just to clarify one point made here, is that when a 3rd party app launched a first party app, it doesn’t close completely. It undergoes a process called ‘tombstoning’ and, although it might be automatically closed by the OS in this state, it can just as well be reactivated by the user.

4) It doesn’t support Copy and Paste. Once again, I’m sure many people would like to see this, but it’s something that’ll be in a future update.

</FairPoints>

Microsoft has not only just made an imperfect copy of an old iPhone, it has not kept up with the current mobile OS crop nor moved ahead of any of them

Really? I would’ve thought offering free cloud service, including remote locking/location tracking and data erasing is quite new? Or maybe the integration with XBox Live? Could even argue that the fact it centralises all contacts from various sources rather having an app for each is something quite innovative. Possibly even the opportunity for developers to create code that can be deployed across three platforms?  I must’ve missed a lot in the mobile market if all of this is old news….

Microsoft has no establishment advantage in mobile today, so delivering an outdated, hamstrung mobile OS and hoping to fix it later just won’t fly.

No establishment advantage in mobile today? Don’t forget, nowadays, ‘mobile’ isn’t just what you have in the handset market. Everything now is about the web and connectivity. I think MS have plenty of advantages in terms of potential :


MS Advantages

WP7 hitting the market cannot be compared to Android’s introduction. Google never had the same number of users and services as MS do when it comes to cross-platform integration. MS have Xbox, the Xbox Live service and the PC market – all of which naturally integrate well with the phone.

Windows Phone 7 should have been Microsoft’s “man on the moon” project, but now it’s clear that the Windows Phone 7 was Redmond’s equivalent of the bungled Hurricane Katrina response effort.

Is it clear? Correct me if I’m wrong, but Hurricane Katrina is an event that has occurred and the response effort can be judged. The phone isn’t even out yet, so how Galen has managed to predict the outcome is impressive. Anywho, the article continues.

If the iPhone is the platinum standard, Android is the gold standard, WebOS is the bronze standard, and Symbian and BlackBerry tie for tin. Windows Phone 7 is clay — a clay pigeon, in fact.

I only quoted this bit because I genuinely laughed. Not just clay….a clay pigeon :D! But don’t take the metals as literal descriptions. After all, platinum has a high resistance to temperature and stable electrical properties.

Microsoft needs to kill Windows Phone 7 and avoid further embarrassing itself by shipping this throwback. It’s not a question of whether Windows Phone 7 will fail — it will — but how long it will take Microsoft to admit the failure. For the company’s sake, the earlier it fesses up, the better.

Ok.

I  love how people are quick to jump to conclusions based on arbitrary meetings of a couple of developers and playing with prototypes. Obviously the article Galen wrote was most likely designed to increase hit counts and garner a reaction. As I mentioned at the beginning, I usually let most of them fly, but I had a bit of time and I feel readers should be made aware of all aspects. I’m not here to say that WP7 will definitely be a success or that you should go out and buy one on launch day. I’m just saying I believe in it and that readers can make their own minds up given a small thing known as facts.

Feel free to comment on what you think (including criticisms of my side of the arguments – they won’t be censored ;)). And Galen, I welcome you to join in as well.

Hope you’ve enjoyed the read and if there’s something in the original article you’d like me to comment on, let me know 🙂

Retweet This Post

@keyboardP

Share

Advertisements

19 Responses to Windows Phone 7: Don’t Bother with this Disaster. Hmm….

  1. sm0k3ydaband1t says:

    excellent write-up good sir, an article you may find interesting because its people like Galen that make this article so true, an excerpt just incase you dont bother to click the

    “Dangers of input and output without innerput can be seen daily. Unfounded rumors that aren’t investigated adequately before they are posted spread across the Internet and are accepted and remain as “truth” even when they are definitively debunked later. Information without context limits its value to readers by restricting our understanding and its meaning to us. One-sided stories without the balance of another perspective create the illusion of accuracy and correctness. And all of this input doesn’t just describe phenomena that are happening in the world, it also impacts those very events because we make judgments about and decide on how we will respond based on these limited data.”

    an excellent article (series of articles really) definately worth a read. thanks again for the excellent article

    http://mobilitydigest.com/psychology-of-technology-less-input-more-innerput/#more-6723

    • keyboardp says:

      Hi sm0k3ydaband1t ,
      Thanks for that, it’s a great read! It’s very true what the article says, awesome link. I’m glad you enjoyed the article 🙂

  2. dropqube says:

    Actually I might be going out on day 1 to buy a WP7 phone 😉

    • keyboardp says:

      You might see me at the store! 😀

  3. Chaitanya says:

    Good article!
    Was shocked while reading that InfoWorld article, but then I scrolled down an Techmeme, and found your response to it. Good job!

    -Chaitanya.

    • keyboardp says:

      Thanks!
      As I say, it’s simply to show people the other side of all the arguments the author put forward. I don’t know if it’s a good thing that most of the information was from memory. Think I’ve spent too much time on Phone7 :D.

  4. Don’t Bother With InfoWorld’s Assessment of Windows Phone 7 http://tiny.cc/dz0ac Galen Gruman was Executive Editor, Macworld, November 1994 — March 1998 (3 years 5 months) I also tried to post a comment but my registration is pending as well. Great article.

    • keyboardp says:

      Thanks, that does explain a lot :). Glad I didn’t hold my breath for the registration email!
      Btw, your short link is dead, but I could access the page by clicking on your name.

      • Thanks, here is the new link: http://tinyurl.com/2uq5uw5

  5. Jesse says:

    Yeah, that article was almost funny. It won’t be feature complete on day one and just like any product of that kind it will be updated and tweeked based on usage but I like what I see. Tiles and Hubs I find especially refreshing, love the idea and execution of it so far. As far as multi tasking goes, developers have control to notify you when their app is updated through either toasts or tiles which in my opinion is a very smart way to keep an app running without a footprint. I also love the app model, C# and Silverlight are very easy and fun to program with.

    Anyhow, time will tell but I came away from playing with the latest emulator feeling pretty good about the underlying OS and UI.

  6. Hamranhansenhansen says:

    > This, being a WP7 blog, obviously believes that MS have a real chance with WP7
    > and are on track to really reinvent themselves in the mobile market.

    You could have just stopped there. In the first paragraph you say never mind the evidence, I believe Microsoft PR because it’s in my best interest to do so. Facts be damned.

    > Err…

    I love that the screenshot doesn’t say “Email” it says “Email setup” ha ha ha ha ha. Everything is an opportunity to do some setup with Microsoft.

    That interface is a dog. Try and spit polish it all you want, but it’s not even Web-quality user interface. It’s all text, you have to read it again and again to use it. It’s just truly awful. This should be called “DOS Phone 7”.

    > Really? I would’ve thought offering free cloud service, including remote
    > locking/location tracking and data erasing is quite new?

    The fact that they may offer this for free and Apple charges $99 per year for it does not make this a new feature. It just shows that Apple’s devices are so good, they don’t have to offer this for free to sell phones.

    > Or maybe the integration with XBox Live?

    Apple has a gaming network in beta that will launch before Windows Phone 7. Apple has over 50,000 games. Apple has integration with Facebook and a thousand other social networks.

    > Could even argue that the fact it centralises all contacts from various sources
    > rather having an app for each is something quite innovative.

    No, you couldn’t. This was the central selling feature of Palm Pre, called “Synergy.”

    > Possibly even the opportunity for developers to create code that can be deployed
    > across three platforms?

    In the first place, that is what the HTML5 API does, and Windows Phone 7 is the only modern smartphone that doesn’t support it. You can write an app with the HTML5 API and install it on iPhone, iPod, iPad, Mac, Android, Blackberry OS 6, Palm Pre, and some of Nokia’s phones.

    Secondly, native iPhone apps are written in C, which is inherently cross-platform. Typically, 90% of your code can be written in such a way that it will run on any platform with a C API (Unix, Mac, iOS, Windows, console games, arcade games.) The Pac-Man that runs on iPhone is the same code from the arcade, just wrapped in an iPhone user interface. So the fact that iOS has a C API, unlike all other mobile devices, *enables* cross-platform development. But even if you only limit yourself to Apple, the code you write in Apple’s Xcode tools runs on Mac, iPad, and iPhone/iPod. For example, if you were making a multitrack audio application, you would create one core app with 3 interfaces: full-size mouse, full-size touch, and pocket touch. You could also run on the Web via WebObjects.

    > I must’ve missed a lot in the mobile market if all of this is old news….

    Yes, you have. Just like Microsoft. That is the whole point. That is why they could release KIN and have it fail so spectacularly. They did not even realize how 2005 those devices are. You’re not supposed to use iPhones in Redmond. It’s a time warp.

    > No establishment advantage in mobile today? Don’t forget, nowadays, ‘mobile’ isn’t just what
    > you have in the handset market.

    Cloud services without any mobile devices are not an advantage in mobile. All the other smartphones already have Google apps, Facebook apps, Apple apps, and more that are more desirable than the Microsoft alternatives. Cloud integration is an app away on iOS.

    In your illustration there is a notebook, handset, and desktop. Key points:

    – Microsoft’s notebooks are the least mobile of all notebooks, they don’t have instant-on, they get the worst battery life, they get viruses when you attach them to various networks, and they have no marketshare in high-end notebooks, where Apple has 90% of the market

    – this is where the tablet should be, but they have no mobile tablet, in spite of being in tablets for almost 20 years

    – handsets? Microsoft has no handsets

    – desktops are not mobiles

    So no establishment advantage.

    At the office where I’m consulting right now, there are 3 key trends:

    – desk phones and Blackberrys being replaced by iPhones (we never used Windows Mobile)
    – Windows/Office desktop/notebook PC’s being replaced by iPads
    – Windows 7 upgrades perpetually in limbo, users can’t even be convinced to do the training

    Users are going mobile, and that is *away* from Microsoft.

    > I love how people are quick to jump to conclusions based on arbitrary meetings
    > of a couple of developers and playing with prototypes.

    Whereas in your case, you didn’t even need that. All it took was Microsoft’s press release about how they are going to reinvent themselves in mobile and you were on board the Vista Phone.

    The thing is, in the article you’re commenting on, the author says Windows Phone 7 is a clone of original iPhone from 2007. But Windows Phone 7 is not even that good. Here are some key features from the 2007 iPhone that Windows Phone 7 lacks:

    – full desktop class browser — “not the baby Web” — with the same rendering engine as ships on the Mac (Windows Phone 7 would have to have IE9 to match this)
    – full support for the HTML5 API, with locally-installable, cross-platform, offline-access, vendor-neutral apps (Windows Phone 7 would have to have IE9 to match this)
    – full desktop class core operating system — “iPhone runs OS X” — the same one from the Mac (Windows Phone 7 would have to have an NT v6.1 core to match this)
    – completely integrated hardware (Microsoft hardware would be required for this)
    – one-sync setup, easy backup, easy upgrades, easy restore, easy media sync through iTunes — “just like the iPod millions of people already know how to use”

    … and that’s just off the top of my head. I’m sure there’s more. And since then, iPhone has not stood still at all. They added a ton of features. Including iPad.

    So count me as unconvinced. Apple spent 3-4 years making iPhone, and Microsoft has now spent 3-4 years making their iPhone answer, and even though Microsoft had an existing device to copy, they have not come up with something as good as the original iPhone, which was introduced 3.5 years ago. That is a really, really poor showing.

    • Jesse says:

      Iphone supports very little of HTML 5 so far. It is a huge standard and yet it will not be as feature rich, outperform or be as secure as Flash or Silverlight ever. I don’t think a lot of people understand HTML 5 and it’s use, yes it allows you to do some fancy stuff without a plugin but it is the same stuff that has been around forever and it isn’t easier to develop or better at rendering it than the current solutions.

      That being said, Windows Phone 7 does need to support it and there is already a road map in place. The IE9 preview is the best of the HTML 5 preview engines so far and it has always been the plan to bring it to Windows Phone 7 when it is ready. Same with Flash, work is being done. The real question to be worried about is not when will Windows Phone 7 get HTML 5 support because we all know it will be here but the real question is when will Iphone get Flash and Silverlight?

      The Original Iphone was a feature phone, so I think you are very confused. It didn’t have apps or games or much of anything. I suggest you revisit it sometime and think before you say things.

      Also Microsoft version of Mobile sync is much different that Apples. It is a feature of the phone, not an addon. It also lets you sync pretty much unlimited type of things including pictures, videos, documents etc while also offereing the things you get in MobileMe for free.

      2007 Iphone didn’t have html5, it wasn’t even a standard yet. It also didn’t run OSX, but a modified version just like Windows embedded.

      I love that anyone can have a blog, but they really should start fining people that throw out false information at every chance they get.

    • keyboardp says:

      Hi Hamranhansenhansen,

      Thanks for the reply. It seems you’ve failed to grasp the concept of basing things on evidence rather than automatically dismissing them. As I mentioned in the post, “[there] are fair points and if the entire article was like this, then it would be worth a read.” This is what’s known as a debate. Some of the points you’ve brought forward are good arguments against the WP7. Therefore, there can be a debate. The InfoWorld article is merely a rant against MS, based on opinion and, apparently, anonymous people asking convenient questions to supposed MS reps. Anyways, let see…

      “You could have just stopped there. In the first paragraph you say never mind the evidence, I believe Microsoft PR because it’s in my best interest to do so. Facts be damned.”

      What are you on about? I specifically said, I believe that WP7 would do well (I didn’t say it WILL do well) and therefore decided to create a blog about it. Anyway, I’m not sure if you’re actually Galen, but you’ve got the same inability to comprehend by the looks of it.

      “I love that the screenshot doesn’t say “Email” it says “Email setup” ha ha ha ha ha. Everything is an opportunity to do some setup with Microsoft.”

      Yeah, well since the image it taken from an emulator, there is no email account. Therefore, it naturally says “email setup”. I’ll give you a moment to think about it and understand the concept.

      “That interface is a dog. Try and spit polish it all you want, but it’s not even Web-quality user interface. It’s all text, you have to read it again and again to use it. It’s just truly awful. This should be called “DOS Phone 7″.”

      Once again, I said the UI is not something that everyone can agree on. I quote ‘Naturally, UI is something that is personal to a user and so I can’t sit here and tell you the UI is great. I can only say I think it’s great…..’ If you don’t like it, fair enough. I find it funny though that you have to re-read tiles everytime because you forget where they are. Most people would read them a few times, then automatically know where they are. Takes all sorts, I guess….

      “The fact that they may offer this for free and Apple charges $99 per year for it does not make this a new feature. It just shows that Apple’s devices are so good, they don’t have to offer this for free to sell phones.”

      It doesn’t show that. It shows that Apple fanboys can be so blind, they’ll pay anything for an Apple feature.
      But, of course, it’s up to you, it’s your money. I’ll use the service for free and you can pay for it. We’re all happy. And, yes, the fact that it’s free does make it a new feature. Definition of ‘feature’ – a prominent attribute or aspect of something – FREE is a prominent attribute ergo it’s a feature.

      “Apple has a gaming network in beta that will launch before Windows Phone 7. Apple has over 50,000 games. Apple has integration with Facebook and a thousand other social networks.”

      Remind me, what home console does Apple have? Apple simply has a games portal, which isn’t even out yet. MS already have 25 million Xbox Live users, so that market potential right there.

      “No, you couldn’t. This was the central selling feature of Palm Pre, called “Synergy.”

      Fair enough, I stand corrected.

      “In the first place, that is what the HTML5 API does, and Windows Phone 7 is the only modern smartphone that doesn’t support it. You can write an app with the HTML5 API and install it on iPhone, iPod, iPad, Mac, Android, Blackberry OS 6, Palm Pre, and some of Nokia’s phones.”

      Yes, because everyone uses an unfinished standard to produce AAA games. By your logic, HTML 2.0 is cross-platform as well and has the right to be counted as stand-out feature – think of the context of the article.

      Fair point about C and correct me if I’m wrong, but development tools and workflow is pretty shoddy on the iPhone. If I was to spend that much time coding trivial things, I would certainly hoped it works on other platforms. Of course, a lot of the apps are done on Objective-C in the first place, so would have to be stripped down to standard C which is a bit of effort. Just as a comparison, you might find this interesting:
      http://www.uxmagic.com/blog/post/2010/07/15/iPhone-versus-Windows-Phone-7-Coding-Comparison.aspx
      Personally, I’m more into productivity than memory-management, but to each his own I guess.

      “Yes, you have. Just like Microsoft. That is the whole point. That is why they could release KIN and have it fail so spectacularly. They did not even realize how 2005 those devices are. You’re not supposed to use iPhones in Redmond. It’s a time warp.”

      Yes the KIN was a failure. But comparing KIN and WP7 is not a simple one to one comparison, and if you think it is, then you need to do a bit of research.

      “Cloud services without any mobile devices are not an advantage in mobile. All the other smartphones already have Google apps, Facebook apps, Apple apps, and more that are more desirable than the Microsoft alternatives. Cloud integration is an app away on iOS.”

      Without any mobile devices? I think you’ll find that that’s because the phone isn’t out yet. The fact that the services have many users already was the point. Oh yeah, there’s an app for that. I love installing apps that should be standard nowadays. How integrated into the OS can an app be? Cloud integration is an app away, but you missed the entire point of that paragraph. Those are MS services, not third party ones.

      “In your illustration there is a notebook, handset, and desktop….”

      We’ve established you like pictures and hate reading text but, once again, the point was the *MS* services that are currently being used. But I’ll answer your points anyway

      “- Microsoft’s notebooks are the least mobile of all notebooks, they don’t have instant-on, they get the worst battery life, they get viruses when you attach them to various networks, and they have no marketshare in high-end notebooks, where Apple has 90% of the market”

      Can’t argue about ‘least mobile’ as I don’t know what that really means. I’ve had no trouble carrying around a Mac Book and I’ve had no trouble carrying around an “MS” notebook. Surely it’s the hardware manufacturer’s decision? Or don’t you like having a choice of what company to buy the hardware from?
      Worst battery life – maybe up to this point but not for newer laptops.
      – they get viruses? Maybe yours do, but I’ve never had a virus in my life. A firewall and anti-virus has served me well this far.
      – high end marketshare? If you mean price-wise in which case, yes, Apple take the biscuit. If you mean superior hardware, then you need to show your sources.

      Tablets are coming out the end of this year btw.

      “At the office where I’m consulting right now, there are 3 key trends:”

      err….enough said. If you’re consulting there, surely it’s going to become pro-Apple?

      – desk phones and Blackberrys being replaced by iPhones (we never used Windows Mobile)
      – Windows/Office desktop/notebook PC’s being replaced by iPads
      – Windows 7 upgrades perpetually in limbo, users can’t even be convinced to do the training

      Right, to each their own, and all users can read this, but I would hate to work in that office. Not because it’s Apple, I wouldn’t mind a Macbook instead of a notebook, but an iPad as the replacement?
      Windows 7 has been received quite well and what training is required? If you’ve used Windows before, there’s very little learning curve. No offence, but I don’t even think this office exists.

      “Users are going mobile, and that is *away* from Microsoft.”

      Really, most people I know aren’t thinking of replacing their desktops with a mobile. I always believed they could work side by side. Matter of fact, I’d like to see integration between the PC and the phone. Maybe a phone will be released this year which allows easy integration. We can all hope…

      “Whereas in your case, you didn’t even need that. All it took was Microsoft’s press release about how they are going to reinvent themselves in mobile and you were on board the Vista Phone.”

      Well no, because the things I said were my opinion as stated throughout. Matter of fact, I provided why I believe the WP7 would do quite well. What the original author (you?) wrote was out right dismissive and my point was that there was no evidence for most of the ranting. The whole point of my response was to show the other side that author failed to do. So no, you should take your reactionary ‘Apple’s been Questioned” template response and understand the context of everything.

      “The thing is, in the article you’re commenting on, the author says Windows Phone 7 is a clone of original iPhone from 2007. But Windows Phone 7 is not even that good. Here are some key features from the 2007 iPhone that Windows Phone 7 lacks: …”

      Is WP7 out yet? I hadn’t realised you got a chance to play with the final version and then do a one to one comparison with the iPhone. Where, may I ask, did you manage to get your hands on one?
      Once again, I’ve always maintained that the WP7 isn’t perfect and that I would love to see why they’ve chosen the browser they have. Do you not understand that not everyone loves what a company does simply because of that company? You keep knocking on HTML 5 and, yes I like it, but to be fair Apple doesn’t support much of it at the moment. It’s still an unfinished standard as well. Don’t forget, IE 9’s HTML 5 support is one of the best so far and it only require’s a software update to support it – unlike an antennae. Speaking of support, I’ve noticed a distinct lack of support for Flash. It won’t be on WP7 at launch, but at least it will be coming.
      As for the OS, I’d rather have a newly redesigned OS specific to phones and embedded devices than a simple port over.
      Completely integrated hardware? Do you mean so integrated that you can’t replace batteries? Or so integrated that you don’t have a choice of which hardware device you’d like to use? Clarify.
      One-sync setup? Easy backup? Easy upgrades? err…they’re all on WP7.

      I will count you unconvinced, but the point of my article wasn’t to convince you. Matter of fact, I said
      ‘I’m not here to say that WP7 will definitely be a success or that you should go out and buy one on launch day. I’m just saying I believe in it and that readers can make their own minds up given a small thing known as facts.’

      It was to give people a more reasoned view than what Galen posted. Personally, I like having the choice of hardware I use. Hard keyboard, soft keyboard, price etc… If you’re not a fan of being able to choose what hardware you have that’s fair enough.Thanks for taking the time to reply.

    • techjunkie7554 says:

      @Hamranhansenhansen Wow, so many of those point are wrong, For starters, the fact that IIphone has 50,000 games and that Apple has a gaming network in the pipeline doesn’t make it any god for gaming. Most Iphone games lack quality AND Microsoft has WAAAAAAY more experience in the gaming field than Apple. PC gaming rules over Mac gaming with an iron fist, and the Xbox franchise is still around, unlike Apple’s last failed gaming attempt, the Pippin. (You’ve probably never heard of it, so go to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apple_Pippin for more info) Judging by these facts, I’d say that Microsoft definately has the advantage in the gaming space. Also, WP7 has the full web, not the “baby web”. When developing I used Microsoft’s WP7 emulator and everything worked fine. Pages loaded quickly, and my tap worked well. Your point about Apple developing has no base either. As the author was saying, when you make a game for one platform, it’s easy to port, which is why you can make a game for PC and edit the controls for Xbox 360 and have it run there. Then you can edit the controls and the image resolution and port it to WP7 and the Zune HD. Not only that, but they had footage of a guy playing a platfomring game on WP7, then continuing from where he left off, except on a PC, then continuing from where he left off, except on an Xbox 360. When you were talking about the cloud, if we were serious, Apple has very little advantage there. Microsoft has all those services listed in the image. Apple only has MobileMe and Itunes. and Mobile Me is a complete failure. About your point about Synergy, regardeless about how new it is, at least WP7 has it. iOS can’t do anything without those apps, and they all seem accidental in that they don’t talk to each other. You have to keep going in and out of apps. Microsoft has easy backup. It’s called Skydrive, as in 25 gb of free storage. If clopud integration can only happpen on an app with Iphone, than it has no advantage since the apps can easily be made for WP7. Hardware advantage is true, but to a point. Iphone 4 hardware was flawed in that the antennae doesn’t work well. With WP7, although they have less hardware control, they can avoid these sorts of problems because if one phone has a faulty antennae (or anything else) people can easily buy a different phone, since there’s a lot of choice. This doesn’t pose a hindrance to the developer, since because of Microsoft’s stricter standards, all phones meet certain requirements. Windows/Office desktop/notebook PC’s being replaced by iPads is a false statement. The Ipad can never noticably cut into PC market share because Ipad simply isn’t a PC. There are certain things that you can’t do on an Ipad, like plug in a USB, or play most web media content. Or what if there isn’t an app for what do need to do? Your whole comment talks about lack of innovation when there’s not much innovation in the Iphone. Other than the browser, there is little inherent functionality on an Iphone. Everything is made by developers. Yet Apple treats devs like dirt, whereas Microsoft has great dev relationships. What’s a really poor showing is that none of your points are valid. Not even the PC vrus one. PC’s have lots of viruses, so they have the best virus protection. Mac’s have much worse virus protection. The whole thing about no Mac viruses just gives users a false sense of security.

      I’ve just listed all the ways Microsft beats Apple, and that WP7 beats Iphone, so I rest my case… for now.

  7. wp7 says:

    What’s amazing to me is that he is able to write such a strong opinion of the device without using it himself. There are some elements of the UI which are not all that intuitive, but once you get used to the paradigm, it is a joy to use.

    Also, he’s clearly confused as to what a tile is. . . go back and reread his references to tiles. It left me confused as hell as to what he was actually referring to. The only reference to tiles which actually makes a little sense was the screen space (where you countered with a screen shot of 7 tiles instead of 4).

    Anyways, we’ll get a better idea of what people think of the actual device next week as devs start getting their hands on the device. Still, there seems to be some traction. . . 200K downloads of the beta already shows that at least some developers are interested.

  8. Win6.5-user says:

    The problem is Galen suffers from Confirmation Bias (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Confirmation_bias). There was no possible way for Galen to deliver an unbiased review.

    Galen went into the review with an anti-Microsoft bias, and only reported on the features that confirmed his bias.

    A real reporter would have taken note of these confirmations, but then look for features that disproved his bias as well. Humans get in the trap of continue testing theories that will confirm their hypothesis, but do no test theories that would disprove their theory. Or at least test theories that they expect to fail, just to confirm that they indeed fail.

  9. Pingback: Podcast: WinExtra On Windows #10 Microsoft Silently Connecting The People Network | Paul O'Flaherty

  10. Pingback: Microsoft shows that mobile means just more than your phone : WinExtra

  11. Pingback: WinExtra on Windows Ep. 10: Microsoft silently connecting the people network : WinExtra

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: